As one of the most successful careers in the business field, accounting has recently thrived on a continually growing demand. If need for education and skill are met, the result is a rewarding and enjoyable work experience.

Accounting is the study of how a business tracks its income and assets. It is the field in which a person is hired to perform reliably accurate and useful calculations to analyze the efficiency of a business. It is a field that has a high ladder and relies on many skills.

It has been a common practice for a long time in the world s history. The first published accounting work was released in 1494 by the Venetian monk Luca Pacioli. He emphasized key ideas and principles that closely reflect accounting techniques today. It gained a large importance centuries later when large corporations and industries formed needing to maximize their efficiency. However, in the 20th century the rapid increase in technology automated much of the task of bookkeeping and required less people involved in the field. Modern accountants rely on the user-friendly and reliable interface of spreadsheet programs. Spreadsheet programs utilize a user-friendly interface to collect large amounts of data (numbers, equations, etc) and instantaneously calculate changes made in it. Such wonders, impossible half a century ago, have made life for accountants much easier.

As mentioned earlier, accounting has a high ladder of success. Among all of the different positions the managerial position is by far the most rewarding. Managers must be prepared to make important decisions and keep up-to-date records which are supplied by their specialized employees. With the exception of management, every other position has very specific and straightforward responsibility. Auditors check accounting ledgers and financial statements within corporations and government for consistency and accuracy. Budget analysts are responsible for managing an organization s financial plans.

Accounting isn t limited to the area of business. An overwhelming percentage of accountants are employed by the government. This work can have high impact on the public but unfortunately can is also subject to bureaucratic obstruction. Government accounting offers a good amount of possible advancement within its branches.

Accountants and auditors work in offices, but public accountants may frequently visit the offices of clients while conducting audits. Self-employed accountants may be able to do some work at a home office. Accountants employed by large firms agencies may travel often. The majority of accountants and auditors work the standard 40-hour week. Many however work longer if they are free to take on the work of as many clients as they wish.

Almost all public accounting firms require that applicants should have at least a bachelor's degree in accounting or a related field. For beginning accounting and auditing positions in the Federal Government, 4 years of college experience is mandatory. Previous experience in accounting or auditing can help an applicant get a job. A large amount of colleges offer students an opportunity to gain experience through summer internship programs conducted by public firms. Those who are planning a career in the field of accounting should have an aptitude for mathematics, They must be able to clearly communicate to clients, and make rational and quick important decisisions.

The employment for accountants is expected to grow faster than industry average for all through the year 2005. Qualified accountants should have great job opportunities. CPA's (certified public accountants) should have the widest range of opportunities, especially as more States enact rules that make it become more difficult to become certified. As the economy grows, the number of business establishments increases, requiring more accountants prepare their taxes and provide useful advice. The complexity and amount of work for accountants is expected to rapidly increase. Businesses will increasingly need quick and specific financial information due to the recent sharp raise in competition.

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